Scene & Heard

Scene & Heard Issue 20

Scene & Heard Issue 20
Here in the UK, we as owners of old, less eco-friendly (apparently) modes of transport, tend to feel persecuted by the powers that be. You think we’ve got it bad? Here’s the story from one teenage petrolhead – who wishes to remain anonymous – in Singapore, a country where being a petrolhead is a difficult road to take… I’m a 17-year-old boy from Singapore, which is one of, if not the, worst places possible when it comes to cars. We pay six times more for any new car than anywhere else in the world; a certificate of entitlement that costs an average of $20,000 to 30,000 * to obtain and is only valid for 10 years, after which you must either scrap your car or renew the certificate and double your ...

Scene & Heard Issue 18

Scene & Heard Issue 18
David Murphy is a name intrinsically linked to the burgeoning ‘Retro’ scene, online and in the real world… but what the hell is Retro? “What did all these cars go to before?” A question asked of me by Street Machine’s very own Simon ‘Motorvation’ Coulson 14 years ago.In 2004, we were standing by the entrance road to Santa Pod at the first ever Retro Cars Show, our own little slice of this world, a forum called Retro Rides, barely four months old at the time. Our stand had six cars on it, perfectly placed near the entrance and we could watch all this stuff arriving. You see, it had been less than a year since this whole thing had got its name, Retro, from the magazine that was organising this show.Now you ...

Scene & Heard Issue 8

Scene & Heard Issue 8
This month, we talk to the CEO of Trakbak Racing, and head honcho of Santa Pod, Keith Bartlett How did you get into drag racing? A neighbour of mine, who was into the racing, first took me to Santa Pod in 1967. I was impressed, but at the time I was rallying a Mini Cooper S. In 1971, I broke my foot very badly when I crashed into a tree during a Japanese Banks rally and, while in plaster, my girlfriend at the time suggested we go to Santa Pod. I went up the bank on crutches and watched Dennis Priddle in Mister Six racing Clive Skilton, followed by the Ivan The Terrible Pro Stock Mustang, and after being there for a couple of hours I knew that drag racing was what ...

Scene & Heard Issue 6

Scene & Heard Issue 6
This is where guest penmen vent their opinions on the scene today. This month, Shaun Wilson: erstwhile editor of the Hot Rod Gazette (nom de guerre: Ed Gasket), and now the voice of Shakespeare County Raceway. For those of you reading who have no idea who I am, I used to produce a little ‘underground’ magazine called Hot Rod Gazette. It wasn’t available in the shops; we just hawked it around a few cruises and shows, and largely sold it by subscription. It was a non-profit making scheme, and all its proceeds were put into sponsoring shows or, occasionally, where a rodder or racer had found themselves in hard times, we’d give them a little something to help out and let them know that they were part of a big family who cared. It ...

Scene & Heard Issue 4

Scene & Heard Issue  4
A column for venting opinions about the scene today. This month, Jon Hill’s returning rantings Where have all the ‘glass cars gone? When, for want of a better term, customising started in this country, there was a wealth of suitable rodding material – it was a time when pre-war cars were plentiful and there really were steel ’32 Fords about, although these, alas, had been raced to death on the oval circuit and were relatively thin on the ground. In the era of the jack-up kit, virtually anything went and we had a massive variety of cars as it was acceptable to modify virtually new cars too. Not surprisingly, this scene of ours has its roots in American hot rodding so it was natural to ape what was going on in the ...

Scene & Heard Issue 2

Scene & Heard Issue 2
This is a column for venting opinions about the scene today – this month, it’s Jon Hill So, Street Machine’s back and I for one couldn’t be happier. I worked on what could be termed the ‘controversial years’ – although they were years that have kind of formed the basis for what’s happened since – and I have to say though, stuff that has seriously divided the scene, too. I genuinely believe we need an open-minded mag like Street Machine back. There are some great forums out there but you need a magazine with a direction to kind of bond it all together. For me, Street Machine had an ethos – one that’s slipped in favour of, dare I say it, elitism, and I personally think we need to get back ...